Tear gas falls on another heated night in Ferguson, MO - CBS 3 Springfield - WSHM

Tear gas falls on another heated night in Ferguson, MO

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Police line the street in a tense stand off with protesters marching on Monday night in Ferguson, MO. (Source: CNN) Police line the street in a tense stand off with protesters marching on Monday night in Ferguson, MO. (Source: CNN)
A person stands in Ferguson, MO with a mask over their face after police fire tear gas canisters and flash bombs on Monday night in Ferguson, MO. (Source: CNN) A person stands in Ferguson, MO with a mask over their face after police fire tear gas canisters and flash bombs on Monday night in Ferguson, MO. (Source: CNN)
Police in Ferguson, MO began to advance on the remaining protesters late Monday night in Ferguson, MO. (Source: CNN) Police in Ferguson, MO began to advance on the remaining protesters late Monday night in Ferguson, MO. (Source: CNN)
Armored personnel stand atop an armored vehicle late Monday night in Ferguson, MO. (Source: CNN) Armored personnel stand atop an armored vehicle late Monday night in Ferguson, MO. (Source: CNN)

FERGUSON, MO (RNN) - A tense standoff between protesters and police ended with the use of flash bombs, tear gas canisters in another heated night. 

Late Monday, police over loudspeakers told the remaining protesters to leave the area "unless they were credentialed media" and would be subject to arrest, but arrests came toward midnight as police moved protesters and media to another area.  

Other protesters were arrested earlier Monday during the first night in which the National Guard of Missouri helped other state authorities secure and police the streets. Some from the crowd taunted police by throwing water bottles.

Capt. Ron Johnson of the Missouri Highway Patrol said police came under "heavy fire" of bullets and Molotov cocktails, prompting an increased police presence that halted the protest march Monday evening. 

Despite the fracas, Johnson called the night "another step forward in restoring order to the city of Ferguson" and praised the peaceful protesters during an early Tuesday morning news conference, blaming the clashes on "violent agitators (who) hide the crowd and attempt to create chaos."

These agitators came from across the country, Johnson said, and among the more the 30 arrested were people from New York and California.

More than 20 people became "loud and quite aggressive," he said. "Several of the protesters encouraged the crowd to turn around," he said. Two people were reported shot, one in the hand, Johnson said, and officers came under fire, with "not a single bullet fired by officers despite coming under heavy attack." 

Two fires were lit, one at a business and one in an unoccupied home, Johnson said, and there were two guns confiscated at a car stop near a media staging area.

He also commended community members that have cleaned up after the mayhem each morning.

Johnson defended the use of military vehicles, saying that one was used to respond to a gunshot victim.

He encouraged protesters to assemble during the day to defuse the situation.

"Make your voices heard where you can be seen and where you're not a cover for violent agitators," he said.

Police officers in tactical gear and driving armored vehicles filled the streets after crowds began growing larger. Some community activists had calmed the crowd, which began to retreat, but others went too far by throwing things at officers. Many of the protesters claimed that there are "plants" in the crowd that were there to cause trouble, and  the protesters wanted to be separated from them. Protesters began making their own barricades and picking up torn down "do not enter" traffic signs. 

Another journalist, a Getty Images photographer, was also arrested Monday evening.

Missouri's governor announced Monday that there would be no overnight curfew in place and said National Guard troops sent to the city would be limited in their responsibilities.

Gov. Jay Nixon had instituted the midnight to 5 a.m. curfew Sunday and Monday in an effort to limit the violence seen in previous evenings' rallies over a police officer fatally shooting unarmed teen Michael Brown. Earlier, Nixon announced the National Guard had been sent to help "in restoring peace and order."

After meeting with U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder on Monday, Obama said Holder would be traveling to Ferguson on Wednesday to speak with authorities and community leaders on the ground.

“We have all seen images of protesters we have all seen images of protests. It's clear that vast majority are peacefully protesting in the street. What is also clear is that there is a small majority that is not,” Obama said. “Giving into anger or attacking police undermines, rather than advancing justice.”

Obama condemned the looters and rioters who have taken to the streets of Ferguson, prompting police action. Obama did say, in a conversation with Nixon, that he wanted the National Guard to be used in "a very limited way."

"That requires that we build and not tear down, that requires we listen and not just shout. That's how we're going to move forward together, but trying to unite each other and trying to understand each other and not simply divide ourselves from one another," Obama said. "Let's seek some understanding rather than holler at each other, let's seek to heal rather than wound each other. As Americans, we have to use this moment to seek out our shared humanity," Obama said. "In too many communities too many young man of color are left behind and seen as objects of fear."

At least six shots fired from a police officer's gun struck Brown on Aug. 9, according to his family's attorney Monday.

Lawyer Benjamin Crump spoke on behalf of the family at St. Mark's Church to discuss preliminary results of the private autopsy. He said they did not feel confident relying on an analysis of the body performed alongside the same law enforcement agency they felt was responsible for "the execution of their child."

One of the bullets entered through the top of the head, and another entered from the front above the left eyebrow.

Pathologist Dr. Michael Baden performed the autopsy. He is the host of HBO's Autopsy and has worked on cases associated with John F. Kennedy, Martin Luther King Jr. and O.J. Simpson.

Daryl Parks, one of the co-council for the family, said the results showed Brown, who was 6'4", had his head bowed and was giving himself up to police when the fatal shot was fired. "That bullet went in near the eye area," Parks said. "It shows a back to front, it supports what the witnesses said that he was trying to surrender."

He said Brown's mother asked if he was in pain. The results showed he did not suffer. Baden said it would be important for them to see results of X-rays on the body, which are taken in cases of gunshot wounds. He added they would have to wait on the medical examiner for Brown's toxicology report.

Crump mentioned the autopsy report from the city has not been released yet. He said the report could have been released as soon as one day after it was completed, but it is at the discretion of the St. Louis County prosecutor, Robert McCulloch.

A caller who was only identified by the name "Josie" called into FM News Talk Radio 97.1 on Friday. Josie identified herself as a friend of Wilson who heard his account. 

Josie said she was told by Wilson's "significant other" and that she has not been in contact with anyone acquainted with Wilson since Tuesday. CNN confirmed on Tuesday that Josie's description is the same as Wilson's account to investigators. 

Protests again became violent Sunday, as police fired tear gas and rubber bullets at crowds.Capt. Ron Johnson of the Missouri Highway Patrol, which has been placed in charge of the area's policing, said Molotov cocktails and gunshots came from the crowd. That forced him to "elevate the level of response.

"We will not allow vandals, criminal elements to impact the safety and security of this community. We will not allow those elements to disrupt or impact the soul of this community. We will ensure the rights and freedoms that this nation provides us will allow for protests," Johnson said.

Nixon called the acts of looting and rioting "a disservice to the family of Michael Brown and his memory and to the people of the community."

Holder said Sunday the Justice Department would conduct its own autopsy in addition to those done by local authorities and the family. During the weekend, FBI agents visited with people who lived near the scene of the shooting as they conducted their investigation.

Brown died in the confrontation with an officer in the street. Police waited nearly a week before identifying the man who fired the shots as Darren Wilson, a 6-year officer who had been with the Ferguson department for four years.

Wilson has been placed on administrative leave. The shooting ignited an outcry from the community and has led to discussions on race and the relationship between the city's police department and its residents.

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