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This Hour: Latest Connecticut news, sports, business and entertainment

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HOT CAR DEATH-CONNECTICUT

Connecticut toddler's death in hot car a homicide

HARTFORD, Conn. (AP) - The death of a 15-month-old Connecticut boy who was left in a hot car in July has been ruled a homicide.

The office of the state medical examiner determined that Benjamin Seitz died of hyperthermia.

The toddler's father, Kyle Seitz of Ridgefield, was supposed to take him to day care on July 7. Police say he instead went to work and left the boy inside the car for an "extended period of time" as temperatures climbed into the upper 80s. He took the boy to the hospital after finding him in the car.

A police investigation into the death is continuing. Ridgefield Police Capt. Jeff Kreitz told WTNH-TV on Thursday that detectives plan to meet with prosecutors to discuss the medical examiner's findings.

OBIT-FAULISO

Former Connecticut Lt. Gov. Fauliso dies at 98

HARTFORD, Conn. (AP) - Former Connecticut Lt. Gov. Joseph Fauliso has died. He was 98.

Current and former state officials on Thursday mourned the passing of Fauliso, who also served as a Hartford alderman, municipal court judge and state senator. He died on Wednesday.

Fauliso was president of the state Senate when his friend, then-Gov. Ella Grasso, resigned on Dec. 31, 1980 due to illness. After then-Lt. Gov. William A. O'Neill became governor, Fauliso was automatically elevated to lieutenant governor, a job he held until 1991.

Former U.S. Sen. Joe Lieberman served as Senate majority leader with Fauliso. He recalled his "inspiring oratory," adding how it was "exceeded only by his deep and abiding commitment" to Connecticut.

U.S. Sen. Richard Blumenthal called Fauliso "a mentor, a model and a mensch," the latter a Yiddish term for someone with integrity.

CONNECTICUT EDUCATION

Malloy, Pryor appear unified at funding event

ROCKY HILL, Conn. (AP) - Gov. Dannel P. Malloy is praising Connecticut's education commissioner for doing "great work," rejecting suggestions he asked Stefan Pryor to announce plans to seek another job.

Malloy, who is running for re-election, said Thursday the average tenure for a non-elected superintendent or education commissioner is less than two-and-a-half years in the U.S. Pryor has served nearly three years.

Pryor announced Monday he would not seek a second term, should Malloy win re-election. Pryor has been a source of controversy as he oversaw the rollout of Malloy's education reform efforts, including teacher evaluations and education standards.

Malloy and Pryor appeared in New Britain to announce nearly $133 million in funding for struggling school districts.

Pryor called his relationship with Malloy "superb" and the timing was right to explore new career opportunities.

AARON HERNANDEZ

Hernandez fiancee to ask judge to drop charges

FALL RIVER, Mass. (AP) - The fiancee of former New England Patriots player Aaron Hernandez is set to ask a judge to throw out allegations that she lied to a grand jury.

Shayanna Jenkins is scheduled to appear before a Fall River Superior Court judge on Friday to seek dismissal of perjury charges against her. Prosecutors say she lied to a grand jury nearly 30 times during the investigation into the 2013 killing of Odin Lloyd, who was dating her sister.

Hernandez is charged with killing Lloyd. He's also separately charged with killing two men in Boston in 2012.

Jenkins' lawyers have argued in court papers that prosecutors set out to deliberately charge her with perjury, and that they failed to provide sufficient evidence to the grand jury.

Jenkins has pleaded not guilty.

ANCHOR LAWSUIT

ESPN's Linda Cohn sues NY rink over off-ice injury

BREWSTER, N.Y. (AP) - A popular ESPN anchor is suing a suburban New York hockey rink over a painful off-ice injury.

Linda Cohn says a heavy change-making machine fell on her arm at Hudson Valley's Brewster Ice Arena and sliced her up so badly she needed 25 stitches.

The 54-year-old Southbury, Connecticut resident raised the allegations in a lawsuit recently served on the rink's owners.

She's demanding unspecified damages plus costs and expenses.

Cohn's lawyer Jonathan Silver says it happened in March in an arcade area of the rink as she was getting ready to practice for a promotion with a New York Rangers' minor league team.

Cohn posted a picture on Twitter at the time showing her stitched-up arm looking like a baseball.

Brewster Ice Arena's owner didn't return a message.

ISRAEL-STUDY ABROAD

Some US colleges calling students back from Israel

HARTFORD, Conn. (AP) - Some U.S. colleges are pulling students from overseas study programs in Israel as the Gaza war rages, raising concerns that schools may be overreacting.

Colleges say security was the top worry. They cite advisories about hazardous travel from the U.S. State Department and from insurance companies that cover students there.

The University of Massachusetts Amherst, Trinity College in Hartford, Connecticut, and other schools left when flights were temporarily halted to Tel Aviv's airport in July. School officials said they were concerned that students and staff in summer programs could have been stranded. UMass Amherst and New York University have called off their fall programs.

Jonathan Sarna is president of the Association for Jewish Studies. He questions whether universities overreacted. He notes that most of Israel was protected by a sophisticated anti-missile system and military superiority over Hamas.

He says schools should act on reality, not perceptions in the media.

FOOD AND FARM-FARMING RESURGENCE

New go-to career for New England's young: Farming

CRANSTON, R.I. (AP) - Farming is hip in New England.

Across the region, young people are choosing crops over cubicles, new farms are popping up and the local food movement is spreading.

Farmers and industry experts agree New England is bucking a trend toward larger, but fewer, farms because many of its residents want to buy their food locally and its entrepreneurs want to produce it. The region's small size makes it easy for farmers and consumers to connect at farm markets and stands.

The U.S. Department of Agriculture's recent census found 95,000 fewer farms nationally in 2012 than in 2007. New England saw a 5 percent increase to nearly 35,000 farms, many less than 50 acres.

The number of beginning farmers also climbed in New England.

Copyright 2014 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

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